Pyramid of the Sun and the Moon,
Teotihuacan Ruin Site, Mexico

Teotihuacan Pyramid of the Moon as seen from the top of the Pyramid of the Sun
In the 6th century AD, Teotihuacan declined, either through drought and famine or warfare. Evidence of deliberate destruction through fire has been found,  confined to civic building along the avenue of the Dead, postulated by some researchers as a ritualistic destruction.
Toltec invasion coupled with drought and famine have been proposed as the reason for the decline.
Teotihuacan, like all cities in Mesoamerica, practiced a religion based on the feathered serpent, Quetzalcoatl, and on the rain god. The rain gods vary by region in name and appearance but have a common antecedent in the Olmec pantheon and are variously called Tlaloc in the north at Teotihuacan, Cociyo in Zapotec Monte Alban, and Chaac in the Maya cultures to the south and east. Archaeologists have found evidence of human and animal sacrifice at Teotihuacan.
Teotihuacan ruin site in Central Mexico was a pre-Columbian city that reached its prominance in 100 AD and grew to the largest city in the Americas.  Teotihuacan was perhaps larger than any city in Europe during the same era.
The artistic and cultural influence of Teotihuacan spread throughout Mesoamerica, south to the Maya region in Guatemala, southwest to the City of Monte Alban, northwest to Zacatecas, and east through Veracruz to El Tajin.

Teotihuacan became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.  The ruin covers 83 square kilometers and sprawls over a huge area in what is now San Juan Teotihuacan, a municipality in the State of Mexico, situated 24 miles northeast of Mexico City.  
First Class Buses from Mexico City's Terminal Norte reach Teotihuacan  

Teotihuacan Trade History

Teotihuacan trade goods,  most notable obsidian, a glass-like volcanic rock fashioned into cutting blades, are found in all corners of Mesoamerica.  
Although the city of Teotihuacan shows no signs of having had fortifications, the city may have dominated other cultures in Mesoamerica through warfare and subjugation, most notably, Monte Alban, a Zapotec city 300 miles to the southwest and the Mayan City of Tikal in Guatemala.

Teotihuacan was long a site of pilgrimage after its abandonment and viewed as a sacred city by the Aztecs.
The first archaeological work of excavation and restoration took place in 1905 under Archaeologist Leopold Bartes. By 1910 the Pyramid of the sun had been rebuilt.  
The Pre-Columbian city of Teotihuacan reached its height in 500 AD when it had an estimated population of 250,000 people.  The site is huge and could take two days to tour completely.

The city grew to the largest city in the Americas and was perhaps larger than any city in Europe during the same era.

Artistic and cultural influence of Teotihuacan spread throughout Mesoamerica, south to the Maya region in Guatemala, west to the city of Monte Alban, and east through Veracruz to
El Tajin.
Teotihuacan became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.  The ruin covers 83 square kilometers and sprawls over a huge area in what is now San Juan Teotihuacán, a municipality in the State of México, situated 24 miles northeast of Mexico City.
 
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Pyramid of the Moon from the Pyramid of the Sun
Pyramid of the Moon from the Street
of the Dead
Teotihuacan Pyramid of the Moon from the Pyramid of the Sun

Reach Teotihuacan

Buses for the ruin sites leave  TeotihuacanTerminal Nortefrequently during the day.
Autobuses Teotihuacan starts at 6 AM and runs every 15 minutes to The ruin of Teotihuacan.

Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, conducted a site-wide excavation and stabilization between 1960 and 1965, clearing the Avenue of the Dead and stabilizing temples and platforms along its sides.
In 1971 a man-made cave was discovered beneath the Pyramid of the Sun.
Various excavations and stabilization projects have continued to reveal secrets of the ancient city but still much of Teotihuacan, America's largest ancient city, remains a mystery.

Bus Service to Teotihuacan

Mexico City’s Terminal Norte Serves Teotihuacan and the Archaeological Site Tula
Norte is called Terminal Central Norte and can be reached from much of Mexico, north to the US border


Find the bus to Teotihuacan at Norte Terminal all the way to the left as you face the line of ticket windows.  Also find Ovnibus to the City of Tula in the same area. 

Four first class bus stations serve Mexico City  link to Mexico City Bus Terminals

Teotihuacan Ruin Site's Two Pyramids

Teotihuacan is a huge ancient city in Central Mexico a half hour by bus from Mexico City.  The sprawling, Pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan is made up of stone buildings including what some claim is the third largest pyramid in the world.  Allow a day or more to visit the site and the museum.  Arrive early to avoid crowds.  Sunday is an admission-free day for Mexican Nationals and can be very crowded.

Teotihuacan History

The name Teotihuacan comes from the Aztec language of Nahuatl and means either Place of the Gods or Street of the Gods.
The city was long abandoned when the Aztecs came to prominence. The Aztecs viewed the ruins as a sacred place built by gods.

The original builders of Teotihuacan remain a subject of debate with both the Toltec and Totonac cultures proposed as the founders.
The first major construction started in 200 BC and continued for several hundred years with the construction of the Pyramid of the Sun in 100 AD.

The city prospered between 100 AD and 450 AD, growing to 11 square miles with a population of 250,000 people that included crafts persons from other cultural areas such as Oaxaca living in barrios within the city.
Teotihuacan influence through trade and possible warfare spread throughout Mesoamerica as far south as Guatemala and as far north as the Altavista Site between 100 and 400 AD.

Teotihuacan Ruin Site Mexico is notable for the Pyramid of the Sun and the Pyramid of the Moon, two of the largest stone pyramids in Mexico.
19° 41' 32.5674" North,    -98° 50' 36.9378"   (iTouchmaps)    Pyramid of the Sun, The city is laid out 15.5 degrees east of North
Teotihuacan Ruin Site, Pyramid of the Moon
Pyramid of the Moon at Teotihuacan Ruin Site is at the end of the Avenue of the Dead
Pyramid of the Sun,
Pyramid of the Moon,

Teotihuacan Hours


The Teotihuacan Ruin Site is open seven days a week from 7 am to 6 pm.
The entranced fee is 51 Pesos.
Arrive early to avoid large crowds and waiting lines to climb the Pyramid of the Sun

Climb the Pyramid of the Sun early to avoid the huge crouds that form by mid day
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Teotihuacan Bus Hours

Teotihuacan Ruin buses start at 6:am from Norte Terminal and arrive at teotihuacan at 6:30-7am seven days a week. 

Buses from Mexico City's Terminal Central Norte serve every fifteen minutes

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Teotihuacan is a huge site that could take several days to visit if you include the museum and climbs to the pyramids.